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7mm Rem Mag

  • stillakid2
    Participant
    Roberts, WI
    Posts: 4278
    #2175668

    Okay… I don’t want a new rifle, I don’t want advice on changing to another caliber. BUT… if you were going to carry a 7mm Rem Mag instead of a .30-06 on an elk hunt, what grain bullet would you use? Or would you just carry the .30-06?

    Steve Root
    Participant
    South St. Paul, MN
    Posts: 5163
    #2175673

    30-06 with modern bullets will do anything the 7mag will do, unless you’re shooting something 400 yards away.

    Buffalo Fishhead
    Participant
    Posts: 230
    #2175674

    150 to 160 grain bullets in the 7mm Remington Magnum will get the job done on an elk hunt.

    Buffalo Fishhead

    isu22andy
    Participant
    Posts: 368
    #2175677

    Something lighter recoil – I was one of those guys that thought recoil didn’t bother me because it didn’t hurt my shoulder . But I couldn’t group my 7 rem mag worth a dam , put me on the 22-250 no problems . That Thing got in my head ! I’d go 270 .

    grpubl7
    Participant
    Central WI
    Posts: 173
    #2175680

    Would not have the slightest hesitation to hunt elk with a 30/06. It may not blow through wind conditions or have projectiles with the sectional density of a hot 7mm, but it is more than adequate for elk if you can get inside 400yds.

    This recent cripple normally uses a 6.5×284 or 6.5×06 (or a smoker), just because I have them and prefer the mild recoil. If I had a 30/06, I would use slipperier 180gr projectiles with controlled expansion for tough hide and bones. Accubond, Accubond Long Range or Hornady 178gr ELD-X…the latter 2 require a 1:12″ twist rate minimum. Factory ammo is available in all 3.

    Elk do not die as hard as some might have you believe. Like any other animal, it’s knowing the anatomy and placing your shot absolutely on call. That is easier to do the closer to them you can get.

    grpubl7
    Participant
    Central WI
    Posts: 173
    #2175683

    Something lighter recoil – I was one of those guys that thought recoil didn’t bother me because it didn’t hurt my shoulder . But I couldn’t group my 7 rem mag worth a dam , put me on the 22-250 no problems . That Thing got in my head ! I’d go 270 .

    Yeah, I am a recoil wimp. When I shot 1000yd comps, lots of folks used the 30-338, the 7SAUM, the 300WM, 300WSM and the 6.5×284. Though I did use the 308 and 6.5×284 at times, the one they didn’t like to see on the line was the 6BR UBL…shot a 105gr VLD at 3040fps from a 30″ Bbl. Hardly any recoil at all in a 14-1/2# rifle.

    Tom schmitt
    Participant
    Posts: 507
    #2175694

    If I remember correctly I used 175 grain nosler partition and 160 grain barnes ttsx to great affect on elk and caribou

    TheFamousGrouse
    Participant
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts: 9541
    #2175786

    First of all, I agree with everyone saying if you have a .30-06 that shoots well, why would you change?

    Also, as a matter of future practical concern, the 7 MM Rem is in rapid decline as far as overall popularity. If you look closely at the rifles that are currently chambered in it compared to 10 years ago, you are down to a tiny handful of factory rifles even available in this cartridge. If you have a loaner available, it’s one thing, but to go out and buy a new 7mm Rem in this day and age, well, just understand you may be buying a rifle that will be considered a white elephant in just a few years’ time.

    Now before all the 7mm guys heap scorn on me, let me say that IMO there’s nothing wrong with the 7. For decades it as rightly seen as a “do it all” chambering for North America and rightly so. The decline in its popularity is more to do with the supremely accurate and capable cartridges that came after it. There are just so many cartridges that use modern bullets to do everything the 7 mag could do and they do it with lower recoil and in a shorter, lighter action.

    If you go forward with the 7MM Rem, I’m a big fan of letting the rifle guide you to the right decision. I would start at about 150 grains and then move upward to see what the rifle really shoots well.

    There is always a sweet spot and my feeling is why fight this? With modern bullets, 10 or even 20 grains of bullet weight makes no practical difference at all in real-world hunting conditions. If you have a rifle that shoots, say, 150-grain bullets really, really well, then why would anyone force-feed it 170 grainers just because some guy on the internet said that was “better”?

    I say this all the time. Modern bullet construction has changed everything. In the past–over a span of many decades–there was a tendency to compensate for poor or inconsistent bullet performances by upsizing the caliber and bullet weight. Theis culminated in the disease Magnumitus Americanas that really dominated rifle development from the 1950s and for almost 40 years hence. If big was good, then BIGGER was better. Damn the recoil man, full speed ahead.

    Starting in the 2000s, the new century and new offerings in both bullets and cartridges convinced many hunters to question if they were trying to make a dead animal even deader by overkilling both cartridge and bullet weight.

    We are now well into a full generation of hunters who really don’t remember a time before we enjoyed the bullet performance and consistency that we have now. In conversations that begin, “What’s a good bullet for…”, the answer today is, “How long have you got?” There are just so damn many…

    After years of carrying a .30-06 stoked with 180-grain bullets, this past season I shot the biggest buck of my career with a 6.5 MM and a 120-grain bullet. Laid that buck out flat, he died with his boots on without taking a step.

    In the same season, my son shot one of the biggest body-weight deer I’ve ever seen with a 90-grain bullet out of a .243 Win. This buck managed to get about 100 yards before he piled up stone dead. This was the 10th deer that rifle has shot with those 90-grain Nosler bullets and none of them has ever made it farther than 100 yards before piling up, and 6 of them folded up like a suitcase and died in their tracks.

    Bullet performance and supreme accuracy even in the entry-level rifle categories have changed everything about what is really needed when it comes to a given species.

    stillakid2
    Participant
    Roberts, WI
    Posts: 4278
    #2175813

    This is all part of a much longer story… and I’ll leave it be, but I am where I am by simply not paying close enough attention. The deal(s) were just too good to pass up if I was going to return to a stage above .308, which many elk hunters also use, and my grandfather used on moose… successfully. Range is always the concern when thinking about the west.

    A part of me is saying, “Enough already. You’re plenty ‘gunned up.'” Another part says, “Remove all doubt and mag up.” Recoil is an issue and honestly, I just don’t want to buy another firearm.

    The Tikka Roughtech 7mm met my shoulder for the first time yesterday and with the muzzle brake, it’s easy to take. So, why not use it? But the .06 is even easier on the shoulder and comes very close ballistically on grain-to-grain comparisons. I also know what the .06 likes, and it’ll drive nails @100yds.

    If I upgrade, looking at 300 win mag (hard to argue against, but recoil) or possibly the new 7mm PRC.

    Steven Krapfl
    Participant
    Springville, Iowa
    Posts: 1123
    #2175818

    I’d carry a 30-06 loaded with 180 Partitions. I had a 7mm Sako, and it kicked as much as it’s big brother, the 338 WM Sako I got, so I dumped it. I think that a 30-06 will do just fine.

    grpubl7
    Participant
    Central WI
    Posts: 173
    #2175908

    One thing about calibers if you shoot factory ammo…

    Some ammo is damned near impossible to find on the shelves. A good example is the latest gizmo caliber…6.5 Creedmore. 7mm Rem Mag, even though enthusiasm is waning, can be impossible to find at times. Not so with 30/06. It seems to be available most anytime.

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