F-150 Lightning

  • wkw
    Participant
    Posts: 505
    #2053219

    Any thoughts on this ?

    Hot Runr Guy
    Participant
    West Chicago, IL
    Posts: 1934
    #2053223

    As much as I am a fan of the technology, they need to get the range while towing up into a more usable number,,,,

    HRG

    wkw
    Participant
    Posts: 505
    #2053224

    Yep. I gotta 2019 High Country with the 6.2 motor. You’ll have to drag me outta that to go electric.

    James Holst
    Keymaster
    SE Minnesota
    Posts: 18924
    #2053231

    As much as I am a fan of the technology, they need to get the range while towing up into a more usable number,,,,

    HRG

    No kidding.

    Lightning Towing Range

    To me it seems like it’s more of a grocery getter than a true work / tow vehicle. I would think the cold MN winters wouldn’t help much either.

    Bearcat89
    Participant
    North branch, mn
    Posts: 16976
    #2053242

    Couldn’t imagine feeling comfortable going up north with that thing. Might as well get a Toyota sienna

    Youbetcha
    Participant
    Anoka County
    Posts: 2209
    #2053284

    Its a cool idea but they need to get that range while towing way up to really be a viable truck.

    munchy
    Participant
    NULL
    Posts: 4634
    #2053286

    Can you imagine a stream of 10000 electric trucks hauling their boats north for fishing opener and each having to stop every 75 miles to “fill up” for 20 minutes? doah

    hartridge
    Participant
    Posts: 68
    #2053288

    How about driving to the mountains from Wisconsin with out towing a trailer for hunting. Usually about 1,000 miles and 14 hours one way. You would need to recharge the battery 3 or 4 times which would add at least 5 -7 or more hours to your trip. Don’t think the technology is there yet.

    munchy
    Participant
    NULL
    Posts: 4634
    #2053292

    You would need to recharge the battery 3 or 4 times which would add at least 5 -7 or more hours to your trip.

    Not necessarily. Tesla Superchargers typically only take 15-30 minutes to charge fully.

    gimruis
    Participant
    Plymouth, MN
    Posts: 13991
    #2053294

    Eventually this may be the future of vehicles, but as others have mentioned the distance and towing seem to be an issue at least for the time being.

    B-man
    Participant
    Posts: 5152
    #2053295

    One day I’ll own an electric truck, but the infrastructure and technology is simply “not there” yet for many guys.

    When I was in 10th grade, I was tasked to come up with a method of electric vehicle traffic for an assignment.

    I always imagined the future would have some sort of “charging-as-you-go” system built into the interstates and major highways.

    Some what similar to how a light rail system works, but still allow you to get off the grid on battery power.

    I dreamed of an “automated electric lane”, where you could drive hands free at 100+mph on the freeways, then take over manually with a full battery bank to reach your final destination.

    Coletrain27
    Participant
    Posts: 4773
    #2053301

    its a cool concept and would be ok for the guy that drives around town and doesnt pull anything long distances. i bet they will still sell alot of them. theres getting to be alot of teslas on the road ive noticed lately.

    will be interesting to see what the mileage range will be in the winter pulling a trailer

    ClownColor
    Inactive
    The Back 40
    Posts: 1955
    #2053316

    Actually, these are going to be HUGE in the work force.

    You’ll be seeing these taking over the states vehicle fleet. Contractors will be running these, construction sites, hwy depts, companies, or anywhere with limited mileage but access to overnight charging (not being used) and these will sell Like hot cakes!

    It’ll be a while for the general public though.

    munchy
    Participant
    NULL
    Posts: 4634
    #2053319

    Actually, these are going to be HUGE in the work force.

    You’ll be seeing these taking over the states vehicle fleet. Contractors will be running these, construction sites, hwy depts, companies, or anywhere with limited mileage but access to overnight charging (not being used) and these will sell Like hot cakes!

    It’ll be a while for the general public though.

    Unless they’re able to run the Air Conditioning for an 8 hour shift the unions won’t be looking at them. jester

    blackbay
    Participant
    Posts: 699
    #2053331

    Actually, these are going to be HUGE in the work force.

    You’ll be seeing these taking over the states vehicle fleet. Contractors will be running these, construction sites, hwy depts, companies, or anywhere with limited mileage but access to overnight charging (not being used) and these will sell Like hot cakes!

    It’ll be a while for the general public though.

    All the contractors I know use their trucks personally to pull toys all over the country. No way they are going electric until they absolutely have to.

    Netguy
    Participant
    Minnetonka
    Posts: 2286
    #2053335

    Range, range while towing, lack of charging stations, lower range with AC running or the heater running are all obstacles for the sportsman.
    If the range is only 300 miles, that’s less than from the Twin Cities to LOW without towing anything.

    muskie-tim
    Participant
    Rush City MN
    Posts: 826
    #2053340

    One day I’ll own an electric truck, but the infrastructure and technology is simply “not there” yet for many guys.

    X2 – The infrastructure is what seems to be lacking right now.

    buckybadger
    Participant
    Upper Midwest
    Posts: 6762
    #2053343

    These are definitely the future. Not the near future though.

    They will sell to government agencies, in metropolitan areas, etc with eventual loaded incentives to switch electric (cheaper tabs, lower insurance rates, something along those lines). I think in rural MN they’re a solid 15 years away yet. The technology will get there. The capacity, power, and size of electrical components and batteries have grown exponentially in the last couple decades. They will get them to a point where even MN weather isn’t an issue. Until then, I’ll stick with my gasser.

    ClownColor
    Inactive
    The Back 40
    Posts: 1955
    #2053349

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>ClownColor wrote:</div>
    Actually, these are going to be HUGE in the work force.

    You’ll be seeing these taking over the states vehicle fleet. Contractors will be running these, construction sites, hwy depts, companies, or anywhere with limited mileage but access to overnight charging (not being used) and these will sell Like hot cakes!

    It’ll be a while for the general public though.

    All the contractors I know use their trucks personally to pull toys all over the country. No way they are going electric until they absolutely have to.

    Yeah, probably so but I suspect many owners will be switching them out (larger fleet commercial companies). Between cost and government incentives, Im sure a lot of CEO’s won’t care about if their foreman is using the company truck to pull his boat on the weekend or not. Personally, if I had a commercial fleet of trucks, I’d be all over these! (Larger cities of course) as you need the infrastructure to support these vehicles and most major cities have or will real quick. Again, more of a work truck than personal use. Obviously, if pulling toys every weekend, you probably ain’t going to buy.

    John Rasmussen
    Participant
    Blaine
    Posts: 4959
    #2053403

    I can see it now, pull your castle out on the lake and in the morning its dead. Now what?

    luttes
    Participant
    Maplewood/WBL
    Posts: 538
    #2053428

    Do you think EV makers are thinking about the possibility that people will actually need to use their vehicles for the purposes intended, or are they just slapping electric motors on a truck that they think will just be used to haul kids to soccer practice and go get groceries? Seems like a whole lot of rush to market without the range being there yet…

    If I could pull my boat 300+ miles and then stop for 20 minutes to charge, clean windows, get a snack, and stretch my legs, I would for sure be interested.

    blank
    Participant
    Posts: 1675
    #2053441

    I can’t imagine a battery powered ice auger will work in cold temps, and won’t be able to cut more than a dozen holes in a foot of ice. I’ll stick with the gasser.

    bigcrappie
    Participant
    Blaine
    Posts: 3796
    #2053452

    Once they get the in road charging done then it will be a no brainer.

    Matt Moen
    Participant
    South Minneapolis
    Posts: 3838
    #2053476

    I can’t imagine a battery powered ice auger will work in cold temps, and won’t be able to cut more than a dozen holes in a foot of ice. I’ll stick with the gasser.

    This. Look how far charging and infrastructure has come in 5 years. That pace is only accelerating. As it does, taxes on gas and diesel will increase thus forcing a move to electric vehicles.

    I don’t believe fossil fuel vehicles go away in short order but in developed countries with infrastructure it will happen in 10-12 years.

    I have a 1969 Pontiac Firebird that runs on 110 octane fuel due to high compression. My guess is in 10 years or so I can’t get that.

    blackbay
    Participant
    Posts: 699
    #2053490

    This. Look how far charging and infrastructure has come in 5 years. That pace is only accelerating. As it does, taxes on gas and diesel will increase thus forcing a move to electric vehicles.

    I don’t believe fossil fuel vehicles go away in short order but in developed countries with infrastructure it will happen in 10-12 years.

    I have a 1969 Pontiac Firebird that runs on 110 octane fuel due to high compression. My guess is in 10 years or so I can’t get that.

    I think gasoline will be available for a long long time. It may only be for offroad vehicles after a while, say 20 years. Just think about how many people are driving 20+ year old vehicles around now because they have to. Where will they be left if gasoline or diesel goes away? Most of the state doesn’t have reliable broadband yet let alone infrastructure to allow the mass charging of vehicles. Yea it will come in time, but in who’s life time?

    I’m not dismissing electric vehicles, but I am dismissing the utopian idea that we’ll all be drinking that free Bubble Up and eating that rainbow stew without any thought on how to get there.

    The Rush song Red Barchetta comes to mind when I think about this.

    Matt Moen
    Participant
    South Minneapolis
    Posts: 3838
    #2053495

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Matt Moen wrote:</div>
    This. Look how far charging and infrastructure has come in 5 years. That pace is only accelerating. As it does, taxes on gas and diesel will increase thus forcing a move to electric vehicles.

    I don’t believe fossil fuel vehicles go away in short order but in developed countries with infrastructure it will happen in 10-12 years.

    I have a 1969 Pontiac Firebird that runs on 110 octane fuel due to high compression. My guess is in 10 years or so I can’t get that.

    I think gasoline will be available for a long long time. It may only be for offroad vehicles after a while, say 20 years. Just think about how many people are driving 20+ year old vehicles around now because they have to. Where will they be left if gasoline or diesel goes away? Most of the state doesn’t have reliable broadband yet let alone infrastructure to allow the mass charging of vehicles. Yea it will come in time, but in who’s life time?

    I’m not dismissing electric vehicles, but I am dismissing the utopian idea that we’ll all be drinking that free Bubble Up and eating that rainbow stew without any thought on how to get there.

    The Rush song Red Barchetta comes to mind when I think about this.

    I agree that electric isn’t utopia….the fossil fuels alone to mfg the batteries and for the lightweight plastic parts are an environmental nightmare.

    There will be gas for a long time but my opinion is it will be taxed to oblivion which will probably force a change. That probably can’t happen til we have really economical options…ie, sub $20k availability.

    wkw
    Participant
    Posts: 505
    #2053509

    And the electricity to charge up these batteries comes from where ? I’m betting a coal or nuke power plant. When the batteries are shot, where do they get disposed of, and will the cost of re-placing batteries be more than the vehicle is worth. I’ll stick my gasser.

    wkw
    Participant
    Posts: 505
    #2053511

    I can’t see semi tractors going electric either. Who the heck wants to drive a truck without 13′ stacks and no jake break. LOL

    Brian Klawitter
    Keymaster
    Minnesota/Wisconsin Mississippi River
    Posts: 59905
    #2053514

    Where is the tax for roads going to come from?

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