Crazy high used sled prices , not today !

  • Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2240900

    96 Polaris Classic 500 2200 miles front bumper is cracked.other than that nothing obvious , tunnel did not have a mark on it Pick it up tomorrow Yeah !

    Attachments:
    1. IMG_6720-scaled.jpeg

    bullcans
    Participant
    Northfield MN
    Posts: 1909
    #2240908

    Price?

    Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2240911

    $200.00

    Bearcat89
    Participant
    North branch, mn
    Posts: 16912
    #2240923

    That’s a steal.

    TheFamousGrouse
    Participant
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts: 10676
    #2240959

    I hope it pans out. If this was listed on social media sites there will be plenty of other buyers telling the seller that he sold it too cheap. I’ve had it happen to me before where a seller pulls out after we had a deal.

    Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2240997

    I was concerned also , already got the signed bill of sale and registration card . I pick it up tuesday .

    bullcans
    Participant
    Northfield MN
    Posts: 1909
    #2241007

    Awesome
    Good for you Don waytogo

    Youbetcha
    Participant
    Anoka County
    Posts: 2197
    #2241011

    I will give you $300 jester

    Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2241026

    I will give you $300 jester

    I will let you know after it has been sitting around without using it , nope not for awhile lol

    Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2241027

    Not sure how these are for ice fishing I believe it has the 121 inch track . But for 200 bucks I knew I had to get it .

    TheFamousGrouse
    Participant
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts: 10676
    #2241044

    Not sure how these are for ice fishing I believe it has the 121 inch track.

    IDO answer: A 146 is basically the bare minimum to get by for ice fishing and most serious guys are going with a 155 like the Polaris 9R because you don’t want to be unprepared when you suddenly encounter 6 ft deep powder. Whatever you do don’t get something underpowered. You’ll want to be pumping out at least 200 horsepower as a bare minimum. A turbo sled is practically a necessity though, if only for resale value.

    Real answer: A 121 is fine.

    buckybadger
    Participant
    Upper Midwest
    Posts: 6730
    #2241048

    ^and for heaven’s sake do NOT get caught dragging that used sled to the lake on anything with a single axle. Tandem axle, fully enclosed trailers are the absolute minimum mode of transportation that won’t completely jeopardize your manhood.

    Bearcat89
    Participant
    North branch, mn
    Posts: 16912
    #2241050

    Not sure how these are for ice fishing I believe it has the 121 inch track . But for 200 bucks I knew I had to get it .

    I have a 02 polaris sport trail 550. Short track. It’s a fine ice rig.

    tswoboda
    Participant
    Posts: 6939
    #2241056

    For $200 just be happy it has any track at all. The way this winter is going you’ll want a wheel kit before a longer track.

    CaptainMusky
    Participant
    Posts: 17434
    #2241059

    A 121 will be just fine for ice fishing, but you can always add a track extension kit to it. I did to a sled a number of years ago. Not bad to do. TracksUSA in lake lillian has kits.

    bigcrappie
    Participant
    Blaine
    Posts: 3793
    #2241067

    Thinking with this weather, sleds will be real cheap here soon.

    MX1825
    Participant
    Posts: 2715
    #2241073

    ^and for heaven’s sake do NOT get caught dragging that used sled to the lake on anything with a single axle. Tandem axle, fully enclosed trailers are the absolute minimum mode of transportation that won’t completely jeopardize your manhood.

    bucky you forgot the trailer has to be a v-nosed drive on/drive off model with cabinets to store all your ice gear. whistling

    grubson
    Participant
    Harris, Somewhere in VNP
    Posts: 1168
    #2241076

    There’s such a thing as too cheap…
    You get what you pay for…
    I hope it works out for you.

    supercat
    Participant
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts: 1167
    #2241081

    On those old sleds check for any cracked carb boots. If the have a leak it will lean the motor out and blow the piston.

    big_g
    Participant
    Isle, MN
    Posts: 21609
    #2241086

    He can literally sell the hood for $200. coffee

    Nice find. I have been looking for an early 90’s Indy… preferably a Trail or 500… not a triple. They are pretty proud of most of them at around $900 and up and they need work.

    Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2241233

    You guys give a lot to think about ! I get it home tomorrow and will be able to really look it over . Hard Core Sled group gave some good info and a link to manuals . Im hoping its better than my money pit 94 Skandic 503r Think the Skandic was not taken care of very well . Plenty of youtube stuff to help with carb cleaning and bearing replacements . I heard we are supposed to have snow next year ? LOL

    Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2241234

    ^and for heaven’s sake do NOT get caught dragging that used sled to the lake on anything with a single axle. Tandem axle, fully enclosed trailers are the absolute minimum mode of transportation that won’t completely jeopardize your manhood.

    That made me laugh ,i can see it a 200 dollar sled in a 5000.00 enclosed trailer and that’s on the low side LOL

    Rodwork
    Participant
    Farmington, MN
    Posts: 3559
    #2241244

    The DNR once pulled over for look suspicious. He knocked on my window and said “who’s boat is that?” For some reason something looked wrong with a $500 rusty old Ford truck pulling a 3 month old fully loaded Lund proV. I said “it doesn’t matter how you get to the lake it matters what you do when you are there and it my brothers boat.”

    TheFamousGrouse
    Participant
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts: 10676
    #2241298

    Plenty of youtube stuff to help with carb cleaning and bearing replacements .

    I know what you mean. I kind of fell back into sled ownership last year after my motorhead 12-year-old HAD to have a machine when the opportunity presented itself.

    I got a crash course in catching up on all the maintenance our old Yamaha sled needed. All the skid guide wheel bearings had probably never been touched before and they were ALL bad, so I had 15 bearings that had to be replaced in the skid alone. The track slides (hyfax) and the ski wear rods were also completely shot, so just to get on the trail there was a LOT of work to do. I have some mechanical experience, but I’ve always avoided a lot of work on sleds so I had some catching up to do.

    I’d love to hear other’s tips and tricks. Here’s what I found to be very useful.

    1. Bearing puller. There probably isn’t an old sled out there that doesn’t need some/all of the bearings replaced on the guide wheels. A bearing puller set is a HUGE time saver for this task.

    2. If you don’t already have them, get a full set of snap ring pliers (inside, outside, inside 90, outside 90). Maybe it’s just Yamaha, but there are snap rings everywhere.

    3. Snowmobiles tend to get a lot of rust on threads and nuts. Kroil penetrating lube, a torch with pencil tip, a Dremel cutoff tool, and LOTS of patience are all required to work on these things.

    4. Careful use of an air hammer can really help with tasks like removing old hyfax/track slides and with pummeling rusted parts to break them loose.

    5. Quality 2-storke oil makes a huge difference. I finally burned off all the old el cheapo oil that was in the reservoir and got the machine on Amsoil and/or Lucas extreme synthetic and now the plugs last forever and the smoke is about half of what it was on the cheap oil.

    Would love to hear from others who have a must-have list or tips.

    big_g
    Participant
    Isle, MN
    Posts: 21609
    #2241322

    For older sleds or to save a few $$$.. i always checked Dennis Kirk in Rush City first !

    mojo
    Participant
    Posts: 559
    #2241409

    Would love to hear from others who have a must-have list or tips.

    A thorough clean/lube when storing the machine in the Spring is a tremendous help to get running the following season. A good spray down with an aerosol lube – use gun oil, chain lube, garage door lube etc, definitely want a lube made for long term use. If you have moisture on metal parts, spray with something like WD-40 first to displace the moisture, then spray with lube. Penetrating oil and WD-40 are not good as a long-term lubricant.
    Get the entire machine off the ground. An old tire or chunk of wood under each ski and a track stand that allows the rear suspension to hang free will work. Run the fuel out, and while doing it, spin the track while spraying lube on everything underneath – the whole tunnel, bushings, wheels, bearings, track clips, suspension parts, hifax and all the adjusters – the only thing you may want to avoid would be the drive sprockets, but they probably won’t slip unless your track tension is a little loose. Hit the front suspension, steering parts and skis as well. Even a little lube in cable sleeves will lengthen their life substantially – again, most important at the end of each season.
    Clutch maintenance is important, most never do it, and the parts are not expensive. The parts are wearable parts for a reason. Less expensive and WAY less of a headache than waiting until something breaks. Parts are usually available in a clutch rebuild kit. Clutch Puller Tools are pretty cheap. Disassembly Tools can be a bit expensive, but a little ingenuity can go a long way toward creating your own. Most clutches are assembled with Red Loctite, so heat and some leverage are necessary for disassembly.
    Lube the Jackshaft and Driveshaft (moisture displacing grease in the zerks) multiple times per season, and FOR SURE at the end of each season.
    Change spark plugs on two-stroke machines before start-up each season, carry spares. If you have power valves, they are actually very easy to clean – check YouTube.
    Build and carry a nice tool set including a knife and headlamp (you’ll need two hands for doing any work, cell phone lights SUCK) and a CORRECT spare belt ALWAYS. Knives are just handy and if you blow a belt, you’ll probably be glad you have one. Again, replacing the belt with proper lighting in the comfort of a garage is infinitely better than attempting to do it with frozen hands in the dark on a lake or trail. If it’s questionable, replace it.
    Nothing but non-Ethanol fuel with stabilizer. Keep oil reservoir full always, and use good oil. Amsoil products are excellent.

    Jason
    Participant
    Posts: 679
    #2241484

    Oh, one of those must buy items that you get bitched at from your wife that all you ever do is work out in the garage and create projects for yourself.
    Ask me how I know…

    Don Meier
    Participant
    Butternut Wisconsin
    Posts: 1477
    #2242135

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>TheFamousGrouse wrote:</div>
    Would love to hear from others who have a must-have list or tips.

    A thorough clean/lube when storing the machine in the Spring is a tremendous help to get running the following season. A good spray down with an aerosol lube – use gun oil, chain lube, garage door lube etc, definitely want a lube made for long term use. If you have moisture on metal parts, spray with something like WD-40 first to displace the moisture, then spray with lube. Penetrating oil and WD-40 are not good as a long-term lubricant.
    Get the entire machine off the ground. An old tire or chunk of wood under each ski and a track stand that allows the rear suspension to hang free will work. Run the fuel out, and while doing it, spin the track while spraying lube on everything underneath – the whole tunnel, bushings, wheels, bearings, track clips, suspension parts, hifax and all the adjusters – the only thing you may want to avoid would be the drive sprockets, but they probably won’t slip unless your track tension is a little loose. Hit the front suspension, steering parts and skis as well. Even a little lube in cable sleeves will lengthen their life substantially – again, most important at the end of each season.
    Clutch maintenance is important, most never do it, and the parts are not expensive. The parts are wearable parts for a reason. Less expensive and WAY less of a headache than waiting until something breaks. Parts are usually available in a clutch rebuild kit. Clutch Puller Tools are pretty cheap. Disassembly Tools can be a bit expensive, but a little ingenuity can go a long way toward creating your own. Most clutches are assembled with Red Loctite, so heat and some leverage are necessary for disassembly.
    Lube the Jackshaft and Driveshaft (moisture displacing grease in the zerks) multiple times per season, and FOR SURE at the end of each season.
    Change spark plugs on two-stroke machines before start-up each season, carry spares. If you have power valves, they are actually very easy to clean – check YouTube.
    Build and carry a nice tool set including a knife and headlamp (you’ll need two hands for doing any work, cell phone lights SUCK) and a CORRECT spare belt ALWAYS. Knives are just handy and if you blow a belt, you’ll probably be glad you have one. Again, replacing the belt with proper lighting in the comfort of a garage is infinitely better than attempting to do it with frozen hands in the dark on a lake or trail. If it’s questionable, replace it.
    Nothing but non-Ethanol fuel with stabilizer. Keep oil reservoir full always, and use good oil. Amsoil products are excellent.

    In the process of doing 99 percent of what you said Mojo . Another tip . Download the the service manual , hugh help to ID parts . Looks like Amsoil is the way to to go seeing they are the leaders in synthetics . I like Fluid Film also . Plan is to refresh and replace the obvious . Carb boots , missing bolt/washer on rear idler, New battery , new plugs ,polaris grease ,new pressure cap,replace missing exhaust spring ,new chaincase gasket . These have been purchased . Pull skid and check track hyfax, check all bearings and track clips . Deep clean seat with M39 IF i can find it ? M4stuggled in deep snow0 to recondition seat . Purge gas from tank using the 2 hose method . Carb teardown and clean and inspect . Drain chaincase , pull cover clean and inspect , install new gasket for chain case . Fill with Amsoil 75-90 . Check brake reservoir and function , and the list goes on LOL In all reality when all said and done i will be surprised i put on 50 miles a year on it . Run a few times on my 40 and trailered to the lake for fishing , zero trail riding . Really could have used a sled a couple times deer hunting for retrieval , my Grizzly really struggled in deeper snow !

    toddrun
    Participant
    Posts: 475
    #2242170

    This thread got me thinking about all the stuff I have sitting in a shed, hasn’t been used in like 5 years –

    2002 Ski-Doo 500f Touring, 2-up
    Otter sled with cover
    Eskimo Fatfish 6120 6-sided popup
    Jiffy Pro4 propane auger
    Legend Aluminum enclosed trailer, 7×23

    Took a look at Craigslist and Marketplace, WOW! Prices are pretty inflated. Makes a guy say “Hmmmmmmmmm…..”

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