Who uses a Richter Anchor?

  • avatarTazTyke
    Participant
    Central Minnesota
    Posts: 473
    #1234109

    I bought a Richter Anchor and was wondering what others are doing as far as size of rope, length of rope and how you are attaching the rope to the anchor? I have heard lots of good about the anchor and I don’t want to leave it at the bottom of the lake . I want to make sure I can get it out if it sets hard. Thanks

    Profile photo of tony_apisatony_apisa
    Participant
    E. Moline Illinois along the Rock River
    Posts: 1,181
    #435193

    I hope this helps you out.

    Boating How Tos | Boat Owner Tips

    Proper way to anchor your boat

    Anchoring

    Anchoring is done for two principal reasons: first, to stop for fishing, swimming, lunch, or an overnight stay and secondly, to keep you from running aground in bad weather or as a result of engine failure. Anchoring can be a simple task if you follow these guidelines: Make sure you have the proper type of anchor (danforth/plow/mushroom).

    A three to six foot length of galvanized chain should be attached to the anchor. The chain will stand up to the abrasion of sand, rock or mud on the bottom much better than a fiber line.

    A suitable length of nylon anchor line should be attached to the end of the chain (this combination is called the “Rode”). The nylon will stretch under heavy strain cushioning the impact of the waves or wind on the boat and the anchor.

    Select an area that offers maximum shelter from wind, current and boat traffic.

    Determine depth of water and type of bottom (preferably sand or mud).

    Calculate the amount of anchor line you will need. General rule: 5 to 7 times as much anchor line as the depth of water plus the distance from the water to where the anchor will attach to the bow. For example, if the water depth is 8 feet and it is 2 feet from the top of water to your bow cleat, you would multiply 10 feet by 5 to

    7 to get the amount of anchor line to put out (See diagram below).

    Secure the anchor line to the bow cleat at the point you want it to stop.

    Bring the bow of the vessel into the wind or current.

    When you get to the spot you want to anchor, place the engine in neutral.

    When the boat comes to a stop, slowly lower the anchor. Do not throw the anchor over, as it will tend to entangle the anchor.

    When all anchor line has been let out, back down on the anchor with engine in idle reverse to help set the anchor.

    When anchor is firmly set, use reference points (landmarks) in relation to the boat to make sure you are not drifting. Check these points frequently.

    Do not anchor by the Stern!!

    Anchoring a small boat by the stern has caused many to capsize and sink. The transom is usually squared off and has less freeboard than the bow. In a current, the force of the water can pull the stern under. The boat is also vulnerable to swamping by wave action. The weight of a motor, fuel tank, or other gear in the stern increases the risk.

    Profile photo of tom_gurskytom_gursky
    Participant
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula(Iron Mountain)
    Posts: 4,610
    #435194

    I left two 80$ Richters stuck to the bottom of Pool 4 last year. I set them up per instructions with a very heavy chain.
    I run a 1750 Crestliner with a 115 hp Yamaha.
    Most of the Guides and Pros here directed me toward large lightweight Fluke style…(Water Spike). It holds in the most powerful wind or current and only weighs 15#. The arm allows you to reverse direction and pull it off the toughest hang up. Some guys opt for heavy 28-35# fluke anchors but that will wear on you fast after changing locations a few times.
    Make sure you have at least 3X your boat length for proper anchoring angle and another 50′ to connect if you have to reverse direction to get her “unhung”.

    avatarstevedobie
    Participant
    Central, MN
    Posts: 478
    #435196

    I would suggest that you use at least 4′ of Galvinized Chain attached to the anchor in the size of 3/16 for smaller boats to 1/4 for larger boats, then add your rope to that which should be at least 3/8″ mooring line. Alot of places use the White/ Gold rope. Make sure you use the proper connectorts and knots so you don’t lose your anchor. Make sure to check your rope yearly to make sure rope is in great shape.

    Good Luck.

    Profile photo of tony_apisatony_apisa
    Participant
    E. Moline Illinois along the Rock River
    Posts: 1,181
    #435197

    I hear ya’ Tom, Water Spike is the way to go.

    avatarTBOMN11
    Participant
    Circle Pines, MN
    Posts: 609
    #435208

    Water spike here also. Those Richter anchors sure are pretty in the box, but they aren’t very pretty at the bottom of the river. With all the stuff that is down there in the river, the Water Spike is a reversable pull away anchor. I use it on Mille Lacs also in the sand, and it holds pretty good there also with lots of rope.

    Profile photo of shaleyshaley
    Participant
    Milford IA
    Posts: 2,184
    #435213

    I run 4′ anchor shocks on my anchors, these allow for 4′ of streach before putting any pressure on the anchor. With these I find I can hold on a shorter rope and in heavier water. For rope I run at least 100′ of 3/8 nylon.

    avatarstevedobie
    Participant
    Central, MN
    Posts: 478
    #435214

    I agree but isn’t this the same.

    Profile photo of tom_gurskytom_gursky
    Participant
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula(Iron Mountain)
    Posts: 4,610
    #435221

    I thought so too SJ…until I got on the river and kept getting it stuck.

    When reverse pulled…the WaterSpike flukes flatten out dead FLAT! The slight angle remaining on the studs and the number of them fairly close allow the Richter to get(wedged)hung…Believe US!

    avatarstevedobie
    Participant
    Central, MN
    Posts: 478
    #410409

    Thanks. You saved me as I am looking now also. I guess I will get the other. I owe you.

    Profile photo of tom_gurskytom_gursky
    Participant
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula(Iron Mountain)
    Posts: 4,610
    #435235

    Thats what we’re all here for! Unfortunately we don’t have an anchor sponsor here yet…it would be nice!

    BTW…I hear generic Waterspike styles work very well…

    Profile photo of tom_gurskytom_gursky
    Participant
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula(Iron Mountain)
    Posts: 4,610
    #435236

    Taz…I do want to tell you that in Lake applications you are less likely to have a problem with losing the Richter unless in thick weeds where they will collect fairly heavy.

    avatarstevedobie
    Participant
    Central, MN
    Posts: 478
    #435250

    Thats what I love about this site, people like you.

    Here is another Anchor by J.E. Chene that everyone maybe interested in. It is fairly in expensive ($25 – $36) and the Mother Ship “Cabelas” carries them. Check it out and let me know what you think. By the time I am done researching achors I think I will have allot to tell.

    Steve

    avatarTazTyke
    Participant
    Central Minnesota
    Posts: 473
    #435266

    Tom. I do fish mostly lakes but I do hit Rainy Lake twice a year and Lake of the Woods once. I know the bottom there can get pretty ugly in spots. I’ll see if this one lasts me. If I lose it, I will just have to go to the Water Spike. I have friends that use the Water Spike on thier Sail Boat and they love how it holds in the sand. I didn’t know they were so versitile. Guess I should have asked the question before I spent the money. Next time I’ll know. Thanks

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